How to Protect Against Identity Theft

Click on the drop down arrow next to the question listed to find out more about identify theft/fraud.

If you can't find the answer you need please contact us.

  • What is identity theft?

    Identity theft is the misuse of the identity (such as name, date of birth, current address or previous addresses) of another person, without their knowledge or consent. These identity details are then used to obtain goods and services in that person’s name.

  • What is identity fraud?

    Identity fraud is the use of a stolen identity in criminal activity, to obtain goods or services by deception. This usually involves the use of stolen or forged identity documents such as a passport or driving licence.

  • How can I protect myself from identity theft?

    You should regularly check your credit report to look out for anything unusual. This could be a sign your identity has been stolen and is being used to apply for credit.  

    For an administration fee of £20.00, CIFAS - the UK's fraud prevention service - can place a 'Protective Registration' warning on your credit file. This will tell lenders that you think your personal information is at risk of being used fraudulently. When they receive an application with your details, they'll make more checks to make sure the person applying is you and not a fraudster. It may mean that any applications you make are delayed while there's further verification of your I.D. But it's better to be safe than sorry!

  • If I'm a victim of identity theft, what should I do?

    You should contact your lenders immediately if you suspect you're a victim of identity theft. They can then stop further spending and start a fraud investigation. When they confirm the fraud, they'll ask Callcredit to remove the details relating to this from your file. That's so the activities of the fraudster will not affect the likelihood of you getting credit in the future.

  • How can I tell if I’m a victim of identity theft or fraud?

    Anyone can fall victim to identity theft or fraud. There are some warning signs that suggest you might be a victim and that a fraudster is using your details to obtain goods or services in your name:

    • Your bank or credit card statements don’t arrive, or you notice that some of your mail appears to be missing
    • Your statements include charges for items you didn’t purchase or order
    • A debt collection agency contacts you about money owed on goods you didn’t order or on an account you didn’t open
    • You receive a letter or phone call telling you you’ve been accepted or declined for accounts you never applied for

    Checking your credit report regularly will also help you to spot any unusual activity.

  • I have been a victim of identity fraud recently. I have informed the creditors but can you put additional security checks in place to make it harder so that it does not happen again?

    You can place a 'Protective Registration' warning on your credit file. This will tell lenders that you think your personal information is at risk of being used fraudulently. You can find out more about CIFAS and the services they offer at www.cifas.org.uk.

  • I have recently been burgled and had my bank cards, passport, driving licence and mobile phone stolen. What do I do?

    If your personal information has been stolen you should obtain a copy of your credit report to check that your details are not being using to fraudulently apply for credit. You can view a one-off report for £2 or if you want to check your report for a longer period you can register for Noddle.

  • I think my personal details have been stolen via a phishing site. What do I do to protect myself?

    If your personal information has been stolen you should obtain a copy of your credit report to check that your details are not being using to fraudulently apply for credit. You can view a one-off report for £2 or if you want to check your report for a longer period you can register for Noddle.

    You should always only open emails and select links if you are confident who sent them to you. Banks and other reputable companies will never ask for your card details or password. If in doubt delete a suspicious email and only enter your information into a website if you are confident that it is genuine.

  • A family member has been a victim of fraud, can I deal on their behalf?

    If you hold a Power of Attorney then you may deal with the affairs of a 3rd party. In any other circumstances the individual named on the credit report must contact us.

  • Back to main FAQ page